biplane12T
object environment strategies
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tomdisilvio.com
biplane12T
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jumblepusher:

Gordon Parks. “Self-portrait”. 1945. (Gordon Parks).
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oktocycles:

Colors alignment. Spot on. #oktocycles #framebuilding (at OKTO cycles)
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itscolossal:

Seen in SE Portland.
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enginedynamicsinc:

Graf Zeppelin under construction, 1929 - 787 feet in length and 115 feet in height. Constructed of Duralumin girders.
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monsieurvelo:

Campagnolo frame builder tool kit-box
monsieurvelo:

Campagnolo frame builder tool kit-box
monsieurvelo:

Campagnolo frame builder tool kit-box
monsieurvelo:

Campagnolo frame builder tool kit-box
monsieurvelo:

Campagnolo frame builder tool kit-box
monsieurvelo:

Campagnolo frame builder tool kit-box
monsieurvelo:

Campagnolo frame builder tool kit-box
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projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
projecthabu:

     Titanium Goose #06927, the most unique of the Blackbird fleet, was the only two-seat A-12 trainer ever built. The first five A-12 aircraft, this being the fourth, were initially flown with J75 engines, because the A-12 airframe was ready for testing, the J58 was bogged down with developmental problems. These less powerful J75 engines would allow the aircraft to reach a maximum Mach 2, and 60,000 feet. Once the J58 was available, all of the A-12 aircraft were upgraded, allowing them to reach a maximum of Mach 3.35 and 95,000 feet, except this one. Our Titanium Goose kept the J75 engines through her total time of service, retiring with 1076.4 hours in the air, spanning 614 individual flights, over double that of any other A-12. Once retired, she spent years in storage at Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, until August 2003, when she was put on display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. She was the last A-12 to be put on display to the public.
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