biplane12T
object environment strategies
"Let me show you the power of images"
tomdisilvio.com
biplane12T
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artandloves:

"Montauk Hiighway", 48 x 48", mm/c
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les-sources-du-nil:

 Vintage Failed Photobooth
(Collection Robert Jackson)
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likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
likeafieldmouse:

Alison van Pelt
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B-24 Tail view
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likeafieldmouse:

Rafael M. Milani
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pragmata-gallery:

"Monolith ripples"
Ceramic plates by Akihiro Nikaido. 

「モノリス 波紋」
大皿、二階堂明弘。
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theabsintheconspiracy:

johnnylovesme
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smile-n-nod:

existential-nervousness:

J’y irai ce soir !!!! Je meurs d’impatience !!!!

Where i am tonight
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dillon Marsh
For What’s it’s Worth
Whether they are active or long dormant, mines speak of a combination of sacrifice and gain. Their features are crude, unsightly scars on the landscape – unlikely feats of hard labour and specialised engineering, constructed to extract value from the earth but also exacting a price.
These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from the mine, a solid mass occupying a scene which shows the ground from which it was extracted. By doing so, the intention is to create a kind of visualisation of the merits and shortfalls of mining in South Africa, an industry that has shaped the history and economy of the country so radically.
This is the first in a broader series of images, dealing with the extraction of precious metals and stones, possibly coal as well. For now, however, the project begins with the first mining operations in South Africa, removing copper from the arid Namaqualand region.
The country’s first ever commercial mine, the Blue Mine in Springbok, began operating in 1852. More mines opened soon after as copper deposits were discovered in the surrounding areas. This, in turn, boosted the development of small towns in a relatively remote area of the country, as workers settled nearby. By 2007, however, most of these mines had run their course and production had stopped almost completely. This presents an uncertain future for the towns and people of the region.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dillon Marsh
For What’s it’s Worth
Whether they are active or long dormant, mines speak of a combination of sacrifice and gain. Their features are crude, unsightly scars on the landscape – unlikely feats of hard labour and specialised engineering, constructed to extract value from the earth but also exacting a price.
These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from the mine, a solid mass occupying a scene which shows the ground from which it was extracted. By doing so, the intention is to create a kind of visualisation of the merits and shortfalls of mining in South Africa, an industry that has shaped the history and economy of the country so radically.
This is the first in a broader series of images, dealing with the extraction of precious metals and stones, possibly coal as well. For now, however, the project begins with the first mining operations in South Africa, removing copper from the arid Namaqualand region.
The country’s first ever commercial mine, the Blue Mine in Springbok, began operating in 1852. More mines opened soon after as copper deposits were discovered in the surrounding areas. This, in turn, boosted the development of small towns in a relatively remote area of the country, as workers settled nearby. By 2007, however, most of these mines had run their course and production had stopped almost completely. This presents an uncertain future for the towns and people of the region.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dillon Marsh
For What’s it’s Worth
Whether they are active or long dormant, mines speak of a combination of sacrifice and gain. Their features are crude, unsightly scars on the landscape – unlikely feats of hard labour and specialised engineering, constructed to extract value from the earth but also exacting a price.
These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from the mine, a solid mass occupying a scene which shows the ground from which it was extracted. By doing so, the intention is to create a kind of visualisation of the merits and shortfalls of mining in South Africa, an industry that has shaped the history and economy of the country so radically.
This is the first in a broader series of images, dealing with the extraction of precious metals and stones, possibly coal as well. For now, however, the project begins with the first mining operations in South Africa, removing copper from the arid Namaqualand region.
The country’s first ever commercial mine, the Blue Mine in Springbok, began operating in 1852. More mines opened soon after as copper deposits were discovered in the surrounding areas. This, in turn, boosted the development of small towns in a relatively remote area of the country, as workers settled nearby. By 2007, however, most of these mines had run their course and production had stopped almost completely. This presents an uncertain future for the towns and people of the region.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dillon Marsh
For What’s it’s Worth
Whether they are active or long dormant, mines speak of a combination of sacrifice and gain. Their features are crude, unsightly scars on the landscape – unlikely feats of hard labour and specialised engineering, constructed to extract value from the earth but also exacting a price.
These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from the mine, a solid mass occupying a scene which shows the ground from which it was extracted. By doing so, the intention is to create a kind of visualisation of the merits and shortfalls of mining in South Africa, an industry that has shaped the history and economy of the country so radically.
This is the first in a broader series of images, dealing with the extraction of precious metals and stones, possibly coal as well. For now, however, the project begins with the first mining operations in South Africa, removing copper from the arid Namaqualand region.
The country’s first ever commercial mine, the Blue Mine in Springbok, began operating in 1852. More mines opened soon after as copper deposits were discovered in the surrounding areas. This, in turn, boosted the development of small towns in a relatively remote area of the country, as workers settled nearby. By 2007, however, most of these mines had run their course and production had stopped almost completely. This presents an uncertain future for the towns and people of the region.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dillon Marsh
For What’s it’s Worth
Whether they are active or long dormant, mines speak of a combination of sacrifice and gain. Their features are crude, unsightly scars on the landscape – unlikely feats of hard labour and specialised engineering, constructed to extract value from the earth but also exacting a price.
These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from the mine, a solid mass occupying a scene which shows the ground from which it was extracted. By doing so, the intention is to create a kind of visualisation of the merits and shortfalls of mining in South Africa, an industry that has shaped the history and economy of the country so radically.
This is the first in a broader series of images, dealing with the extraction of precious metals and stones, possibly coal as well. For now, however, the project begins with the first mining operations in South Africa, removing copper from the arid Namaqualand region.
The country’s first ever commercial mine, the Blue Mine in Springbok, began operating in 1852. More mines opened soon after as copper deposits were discovered in the surrounding areas. This, in turn, boosted the development of small towns in a relatively remote area of the country, as workers settled nearby. By 2007, however, most of these mines had run their course and production had stopped almost completely. This presents an uncertain future for the towns and people of the region.
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nothingtochance:

Field Rule / BEST MADE COMPANY
Scoping out the foundations of a new cabin, dialing in an archery range, evaluating the girth of a tree: the Best Made Field Rule is designed to quickly and accurately measure long distances. Our lasting glass fiber rule, and almost all of its components, are made exclusively for us in a small precision instrument factory in Germany, and it is guaranteed accurate to at least 0.46mm / m.
nothingtochance:

Field Rule / BEST MADE COMPANY
Scoping out the foundations of a new cabin, dialing in an archery range, evaluating the girth of a tree: the Best Made Field Rule is designed to quickly and accurately measure long distances. Our lasting glass fiber rule, and almost all of its components, are made exclusively for us in a small precision instrument factory in Germany, and it is guaranteed accurate to at least 0.46mm / m.
nothingtochance:

Field Rule / BEST MADE COMPANY
Scoping out the foundations of a new cabin, dialing in an archery range, evaluating the girth of a tree: the Best Made Field Rule is designed to quickly and accurately measure long distances. Our lasting glass fiber rule, and almost all of its components, are made exclusively for us in a small precision instrument factory in Germany, and it is guaranteed accurate to at least 0.46mm / m.
nothingtochance:

Field Rule / BEST MADE COMPANY
Scoping out the foundations of a new cabin, dialing in an archery range, evaluating the girth of a tree: the Best Made Field Rule is designed to quickly and accurately measure long distances. Our lasting glass fiber rule, and almost all of its components, are made exclusively for us in a small precision instrument factory in Germany, and it is guaranteed accurate to at least 0.46mm / m.
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lehroi:

 Michael Zuhorski