biplane12T
object environment strategies
"Let me show you the power of images"
tomdisilvio.com
biplane12T
+
me-raabenstein:

http://clocktower.org/show/om-episode-28orbital mash episode #28 - future’s rented lullaby - a radio art special - mixed and presented by me raabensteinmost of modern artist and composer’s work utilizes electronic tools and archives. imagine someone in the future discovers the hard disc of raabenstein’s label nonine recordings with most content broken or missing. this episode is a possible scenario for what might be assembled with the remainder, a collage of the nonine archives primary disaggregated - ultimately all parts recomposed and rearranged… enjoy the melody !!!
+
dkellyphotography:

nora muse #1
d kelly photography
dkellyphotography:

nora muse #1
d kelly photography
dkellyphotography:

nora muse #1
d kelly photography
+
dkellyphotography:

" 46 "    bergen county  nj
d kelly photography
dkellyphotography:

" 46 "    bergen county  nj
d kelly photography
dkellyphotography:

" 46 "    bergen county  nj
d kelly photography
+
+
Ripples Outdoor bench by HORM furniture 2 (via Pin by Tom DiSilvio on i non-object | Pinterest)
+
gacougnol:

Kikuji Kawada
The Sun Wind, Tokyo from “The Last Cosmology” 1988
+
Haiku Poster — 1 by _Untitled-1 on Flickr (via Pin by Tom DiSilvio on type/graphics | Pinterest)
+
+
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bill Thompson
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bill Thompson
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bill Thompson
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bill Thompson
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bill Thompson
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bill Thompson
+
+
theenergyissue:

Kraftwerk: Pioneers of Electronic Music
Formed in 1970 in Düsseldorf by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, the German electronic music band Kraftwerk was one of the first groups to popularize electronic music. Using strictly electronic—and often custom built—instrumentation, Kraftwerk created a signature minimalist sound combining driving, repetitive rhythms with catchy melodies. Lyrics, often sung through a Vocoder, deal with post-war European urban life, and technology—traveling by car on the Autobahn, traveling by train, using home computers, and the advent of nuclear power. The rhythmic structure of songs imitated the motion and energy of these experiences. The band’s distinct imagery, characterized by a sharp and minimal graphic aesthetic, was also consciously refined to reflect the modern condition. Kraftwerk, self-styled as clean-cut, robotic youths, at once represented the dual senses of freedom and alienation induced by modern technology. 
theenergyissue:

Kraftwerk: Pioneers of Electronic Music
Formed in 1970 in Düsseldorf by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, the German electronic music band Kraftwerk was one of the first groups to popularize electronic music. Using strictly electronic—and often custom built—instrumentation, Kraftwerk created a signature minimalist sound combining driving, repetitive rhythms with catchy melodies. Lyrics, often sung through a Vocoder, deal with post-war European urban life, and technology—traveling by car on the Autobahn, traveling by train, using home computers, and the advent of nuclear power. The rhythmic structure of songs imitated the motion and energy of these experiences. The band’s distinct imagery, characterized by a sharp and minimal graphic aesthetic, was also consciously refined to reflect the modern condition. Kraftwerk, self-styled as clean-cut, robotic youths, at once represented the dual senses of freedom and alienation induced by modern technology. 
theenergyissue:

Kraftwerk: Pioneers of Electronic Music
Formed in 1970 in Düsseldorf by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, the German electronic music band Kraftwerk was one of the first groups to popularize electronic music. Using strictly electronic—and often custom built—instrumentation, Kraftwerk created a signature minimalist sound combining driving, repetitive rhythms with catchy melodies. Lyrics, often sung through a Vocoder, deal with post-war European urban life, and technology—traveling by car on the Autobahn, traveling by train, using home computers, and the advent of nuclear power. The rhythmic structure of songs imitated the motion and energy of these experiences. The band’s distinct imagery, characterized by a sharp and minimal graphic aesthetic, was also consciously refined to reflect the modern condition. Kraftwerk, self-styled as clean-cut, robotic youths, at once represented the dual senses of freedom and alienation induced by modern technology. 
theenergyissue:

Kraftwerk: Pioneers of Electronic Music
Formed in 1970 in Düsseldorf by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, the German electronic music band Kraftwerk was one of the first groups to popularize electronic music. Using strictly electronic—and often custom built—instrumentation, Kraftwerk created a signature minimalist sound combining driving, repetitive rhythms with catchy melodies. Lyrics, often sung through a Vocoder, deal with post-war European urban life, and technology—traveling by car on the Autobahn, traveling by train, using home computers, and the advent of nuclear power. The rhythmic structure of songs imitated the motion and energy of these experiences. The band’s distinct imagery, characterized by a sharp and minimal graphic aesthetic, was also consciously refined to reflect the modern condition. Kraftwerk, self-styled as clean-cut, robotic youths, at once represented the dual senses of freedom and alienation induced by modern technology. 
+
theenergyissue:

"Media Burn" by Ant Farm
Ant Farm was an innovative collective working in media, architecture and spectacle established within the counter-cultural milieu of 1968 San Francisco. Created by two architects, Chip Lord and Doug Michels, and later joined by Curtis Schreier, their work dealt with the intersection of architecture, design and media art, critiquing the North American culture of mass media and consumerism. Ant Farm produced works in a number of formats, including agitprop events, manifestos, videos, performances and installations. In Media Burn, integrating performance, spectacle and media critique, Ant Farm staged an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets
theenergyissue:

"Media Burn" by Ant Farm
Ant Farm was an innovative collective working in media, architecture and spectacle established within the counter-cultural milieu of 1968 San Francisco. Created by two architects, Chip Lord and Doug Michels, and later joined by Curtis Schreier, their work dealt with the intersection of architecture, design and media art, critiquing the North American culture of mass media and consumerism. Ant Farm produced works in a number of formats, including agitprop events, manifestos, videos, performances and installations. In Media Burn, integrating performance, spectacle and media critique, Ant Farm staged an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets
theenergyissue:

"Media Burn" by Ant Farm
Ant Farm was an innovative collective working in media, architecture and spectacle established within the counter-cultural milieu of 1968 San Francisco. Created by two architects, Chip Lord and Doug Michels, and later joined by Curtis Schreier, their work dealt with the intersection of architecture, design and media art, critiquing the North American culture of mass media and consumerism. Ant Farm produced works in a number of formats, including agitprop events, manifestos, videos, performances and installations. In Media Burn, integrating performance, spectacle and media critique, Ant Farm staged an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets
theenergyissue:

"Media Burn" by Ant Farm
Ant Farm was an innovative collective working in media, architecture and spectacle established within the counter-cultural milieu of 1968 San Francisco. Created by two architects, Chip Lord and Doug Michels, and later joined by Curtis Schreier, their work dealt with the intersection of architecture, design and media art, critiquing the North American culture of mass media and consumerism. Ant Farm produced works in a number of formats, including agitprop events, manifestos, videos, performances and installations. In Media Burn, integrating performance, spectacle and media critique, Ant Farm staged an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets
theenergyissue:

"Media Burn" by Ant Farm
Ant Farm was an innovative collective working in media, architecture and spectacle established within the counter-cultural milieu of 1968 San Francisco. Created by two architects, Chip Lord and Doug Michels, and later joined by Curtis Schreier, their work dealt with the intersection of architecture, design and media art, critiquing the North American culture of mass media and consumerism. Ant Farm produced works in a number of formats, including agitprop events, manifestos, videos, performances and installations. In Media Burn, integrating performance, spectacle and media critique, Ant Farm staged an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets
theenergyissue:

"Media Burn" by Ant Farm
Ant Farm was an innovative collective working in media, architecture and spectacle established within the counter-cultural milieu of 1968 San Francisco. Created by two architects, Chip Lord and Doug Michels, and later joined by Curtis Schreier, their work dealt with the intersection of architecture, design and media art, critiquing the North American culture of mass media and consumerism. Ant Farm produced works in a number of formats, including agitprop events, manifestos, videos, performances and installations. In Media Burn, integrating performance, spectacle and media critique, Ant Farm staged an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets